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I don't want to be, therefore I am undefined

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regret

I was asked the question, “In five years, which will you regret more: the fact that you did, or the fact that you didn’t?”

And honestly, I will probably regret it if I didn’t. So, I am going to stay the course and enjoy the now. Because the now is pretty damn great.

Filed under erin's deep thinks

1,599 notes

squeaky-bits:

bits-and-spurs:

(This article was written by SSTack )”It’s safe to say that a barn fire is every horse owner’s worst nightmare.
While visiting Stachowski Farm last week, the Schneiders crew discovered a fascinating safety measure that I personally have never seen before. By the barn door, under two fire extinguishers, was a rack full of red halters with red and white leads attached.Upon closer inspection, we noticed that the chin pieces had been removed and the lead ropes threaded through the brass attachment”
“In case of a fire, your first objective is to safely remove your horses from the area. Seconds count. In this situation, you don’t have time to run around looking for halters for everyone. Even if you have halters and leads on each stall door, trying to fasten buckles or tie rope halters on panicky horses wastes valuable time. With these particular fire halters, handlers can slip them on quickly and go. Having them all in one place so everyone knows where to find them saves even more time.
Want to implement this safety measure in your barn? Simply invest in one nylon halter (like this one) and lead (like this one) per horse. Cut the nylon chin piece and throat piece off the halter so you are left with the nose piece, cheek pieces and crown piece alone. Then clip your lead to the brass ring on the right side of the halter and slide the opposite end of the lead through the brass ring on the left side.”
“Now your fire halter is assembled and ready to go! Keep your halter(s) in one easily accessible place in case of emergency, and let everyone at your barn know where to find them.”Written by SSTack, This article can be found here

This is a super good idea.Also, if the horses are panicked and not wanting to go forward, the extra pressure under the chin could be handy.

squeaky-bits:

bits-and-spurs:

(This article was written by SSTack )
It’s safe to say that a barn fire is every horse owner’s worst nightmare.

While visiting Stachowski Farm last week, the Schneiders crew discovered a fascinating safety measure that I personally have never seen before. By the barn door, under two fire extinguishers, was a rack full of red halters with red and white leads attached.
Upon closer inspection, we noticed that the chin pieces had been removed and the lead ropes threaded through the brass attachment”

In case of a fire, your first objective is to safely remove your horses from the area. Seconds count. In this situation, you don’t have time to run around looking for halters for everyone. Even if you have halters and leads on each stall door, trying to fasten buckles or tie rope halters on panicky horses wastes valuable time. With these particular fire halters, handlers can slip them on quickly and go. Having them all in one place so everyone knows where to find them saves even more time.

Want to implement this safety measure in your barn? Simply invest in one nylon halter (like this one) and lead (like this one) per horse. Cut the nylon chin piece and throat piece off the halter so you are left with the nose piece, cheek pieces and crown piece alone. Then clip your lead to the brass ring on the right side of the halter and slide the opposite end of the lead through the brass ring on the left side.”

Now your fire halter is assembled and ready to go! Keep your halter(s) in one easily accessible place in case of emergency, and let everyone at your barn know where to find them.”
Written by SSTack, This article can be found here

This is a super good idea.
Also, if the horses are panicked and not wanting to go forward, the extra pressure under the chin could be handy.

(via 3quus)

Filed under horses emergency preparedness

129,828 notes

1. If he doesn’t answer, don’t keep sending texts. If he wanted to talk to you, he would’ve responded.

2. People will make time for you when they care about you. If he says he’s too busy or constantly cancels his plans, he doesn’t care. People fight for you when they care.

3. Don’t let him touch you on the first date. If he tries, he’s not there for the same reasons you are.

4. You can tell a lot about a person by their favorite book.

5. If he can stomach more than ten straight shots without feeling a thing, he drinks too much.

6. Ask the uncomfortable things. When was the last time he was so high he couldn’t speak? What does he regret the most? Does he drink to remember or to forget?

7. Don’t send pictures unless you want to. If he has to talk you into it, don’t do it. If you hesitate, don’t do it. If you do take a picture, don’t include your face. Keep yourself safe.

8. If you can’t laugh when you’re having sex with him, maybe you aren’t sleeping with the right person. Sex isn’t about tricks and tips and routines.

9. If he hurts you, cut him out. He’s gone, he isn’t coming back, and you don’t need to prolong the pain.

10. Don’t be afraid to open up again. I promise not everyone will love you with a knife behind their back.

Boy advice from someone who made the same mistakes too often (via thesillysorostitute)

(Source: guiseofgentlewords, via poniespoems)

Filed under love advice